U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization signed a five year agreement to prevent from the impact of climate change on health

The U.S Environmental protection agency represented by the Administrator Mr Michael S. Regan and World health organization by the Director General Dr. Tedros D who signed a five year agreement called “Memorandum of Understanding” or MOU. This contract is a collaboration between two high organization to prevent people from the impact of climate change on health.

EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan copyright EPA

EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan said:

I am proud to renew EPA’s commitment to working with the WHO to protect the public from the health risks of pollution,” The United States is committed to working closely with WHO, a global leader in protecting human health for all, with a particular focus on addressing the needs of vulnerable and underserved communities. As we face new challenges from climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic, this collaboration with the WHO has never been more critical.”

EPA and WHO have a long history of collaboration on the most pressing public health issues of our time. The two organization worked over three decades on climate change mainly for instance : air quality, children’s environmental health, chemicals and toxics, water and sanitation, and quantifying the environmental burden of disease.

“I am proud to renew EPA’s commitment to working with the WHO to protect the public from the health risks of pollution,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “The United States is committed to working closely with WHO, a global leader in protecting human health for all, with a particular focus on addressing the needs of vulnerable and underserved communities. As we face new challenges from climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic, this collaboration with the WHO has never been more critical.”

The EPA’s mission is to protect human health and the environment fully aligns with WHO’s charge to lead global efforts to promote health for everyone, everywhere. The WHO estimates that 24% of all global deaths, and 28% of deaths among children under five, are linked to the environment, and people in low- and middle-income countries bear the greatest disease burden.

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General commented

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the intimate links between humans and our environment,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “Addressing those links is essential to prevent diseases, including future pandemics, to promote health, drive the global recovery and reduce health risks associated with climate change, especially for the most vulnerable. WHO looks forward to continuing its longstanding collaboration with US EPA, and to tapping EPA’s expertise to advance our mission to support countries in meeting the challenges of environmental health.”

Joe Biden president of US, one year after

One of the most unforgettable time was when Mr Joe biden was in the white house “the Ovale office”. In front of the journalists, he was sitting in his chair to take charge of some files that he had to quickly sign. Without resting, he was shown to the camera to explain that he is also, like Trump could take decisions quickly.

In the same direction that EPA and WHo, he has considered climate change as one of its priority. On the White house’s site is mentionned that: the President is mobilizing a whole-of-government effort to reduce climate pollution in every sector of the economy and increase resilience to climate impacts.

Some months after, during the COP26, Biden declared “

Action and solidarity, that’s what’s required. And we all know it. And I’ll — I apologize if I’m repeating some of what you’ve already said.(…) As I said earlier today, we’ve set ambitious goals of reducing U.S. greenhouse gases emissions by 50 to 52 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. That’s a goal line with limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. But the math only works if every country does its part and those countries that don’t have the wherewithal get the kind of help they need.

Every major economy needs to enhance its Paris targets, in my view, to a level that will keep our goal within reach. And then — and then continue to raise our standards. Developing economies need to take meaningful mitigation adaptation actions as well, but they’re going to need help.

EPA and WHO want to go beyond what it did in the past. Together, it will target on protecting children by reducing exposure to toxic substances in particular lead-based paint. A new area of cooperation is the core of EPA to protect vulnerable and underserved community. WHO’s Triple Billion targets outline an ambitious plan for the world to achieve good health for all. Both EPA and WHO prioritize using science as the basis for policies and programs to address environmental health impacts.

Source: EPA — Who — White house

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Journalist-writer, I do love photography for some events. I buy photos and content English/FR.

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Hafida B

Hafida B

Journalist-writer, I do love photography for some events. I buy photos and content English/FR.

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